Grey's Anatomy: Don't Stand So Close To Me
Grey's Anatomy: Don't Stand So Close To Me
Following last week's super-intense Grey's Anatomy, last night was more somber, subdued, with a crazy medical procedure to take our minds off the poor state of many of the character's lives. What's the crazy medical situation, you ask? It's Siamese...oh, oops, I mean...it's Conjoined Twins! Adult conjoined twins, that is, and they want to be separated. For a girl. The conjoined twins were played by the Sklar brothers (Randy and Jason), who sports fans might know from ESPN's Cheap Seats, which I believe is no longer producing new episodes. They burst onto the scene a few years ago with a documentary on their love of St. Louis Cardinals great Jose Oquendo. Okay, maybe they didn't "burst" onto the scene. But, their fame is certainly palpable in some segments of the population.
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The Sklar brothers are either kind of funny or horrendously unfunny. I can never tell. However, they did play their roles on Grey's Anatomy quite admirably and it seems as if the roles may have been written especially for them, though this seems highly improbable. Anyway, Shepard and Sloan must work together (along with twenty other doctors) to successfully perform the surgery. Still reeling from the news about Burke and his tremors, Derek isn't his confident self and doesn't want to perform the surgery, citing excess risk. He comes around eventually, obviously. Redemption was big in this episode, which was actually a little early for my tastes. After Cristina and Burke were found out last episode, I had expected them to be ostracized for longer than one episode. Burke is redeemed by helping out George's dad before surgery and then giving George a calm play-by-play of the actual surgery. Cristina was redeemed with help from Meredith. However, her redemption only came through in the eyes of Burke; her fellow interns aren't there yet. Burke's actions grew on me this episode. He didn't explain himself, didn't feel he needed to, but his actions spoke loud. He took a huge swallow of pride by leading George through his father's surgery, especially since Dr. Hahn was performing it. What Grey's Anatomy has mastered, and where it's so successful, is in creating these hugely complex characters who have different histories and unique dynamics with each other. They are very human, not over the top. Grey's Anatomy leaves the over-the-top aspects to the medical situations. Thus, we have the necessary TV juxtaposition of the normal and the "only on TV" but not at the expense of the believability of the characters. Grey's could've easily had a let down episode after last week's epic. But they didn't, keeping up the momentum of what has been a great season thus far. -Oscar Dahl, BuddyTV Senior Writer

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