'So You Think You Can Dance' Rejuvenates Love for Dancing
'So You Think You Can Dance' Rejuvenates Love for Dancing
With reality talent-based reality shows such as American Idol and So You Think You Can Dance, artistic endeavors and performances are currently experiencing a renaissance of sorts.  Dancing in particular is enjoying a resurgence of popularity across various age groups, including the younger set.

Thanks to dance competition programs like So You Think You Can Dance and Dancing with the Stars, traditional dances like ballroom are becoming increasingly popular even with the younger crowd.

Amazingly, while So You Think You Can Dance does not have headline-grabbing film, television, sports and other entertainment personalities for contestants, the show managed to consistently draw over 10 million viewers.  When it hit the road for a tour of cities across the U.S., large crowds turned out for the performances, eager to see truly fine dancing live and in the flesh.

So You Think You Can Dance's U.S. Tour kicked off September 21 at Times Union Center in Albany, New York.  Featuring its top 10 finalists, the traveling show gave nearly 50 performances, culminating in Reno, Nevada on November 30th.

Over 7,000 avid fans attended the tour's penultimate offering in Everett, Washington just to enjoy a showcase of fabulous dancing talent.

"This is an honor and a dream come true, to be on this stage right now," Dominic Sandoval, one of the finalists, remarked.

Sandoval paired off with this season's champion, Sabra Johnson, in a number set to the tune of the Pretenders' “I'll Stand by You,” which was greeted with thunderous applause when it concluded.

Of course, among the most widely cheered of the show was Neil Haskell, who has been season 3's resident heartthrob.

While live dance performances are not normally as widely and enthusiastically patronized as concerts, but the popularity of So You Think You Can Dance, both as a TV show and a live performance seems to have turned the tide.  In the words of one of its fans, 31-year old Denise Rolak explained saying, “I think dancing is inherent in what we are as human beings and to see people do it well is entertaining."


-Rosario Santiago, BuddyTV Staff Columnist
Source: San Francisco Chronicle, HeraldNet
(Image Courtesy of FOX)

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