America's Got Talent 3: Episode 5 Recap
America's Got Talent 3: Episode 5 Recap
It's Tuesday, and that means it's time for some more America's Got Talent fun.  Judges Piers Morgan, Sharon Osbourne and David Hasselhoff are still traveling back and forth from city to city to find the latest and greatest American talent.  Last week, a man set the stage aflame, an 11-year-old girl did an amazing contortionist routine, and a man from humble beginning wowed audiences with his singing talent.

This week the auditions continue to find the next great act to have a show on the Vegas strip alongside Bette Midler, the Blue Man Group, Rita Rudner and Terry Fator.  There's a million dollars on the line as well, and the talent lining up for their chance at the America's Got Talent prize is only getting better and better.
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We’re back once again in Atlanta. 29-year-old banker Michelle Wallace is a singer from Birmingham who thinks her voice is a gift to share with the whole world. Predictably, she is not good, though she does successfully get the audience to stand and wave their arms before she butchers “All By Myself.”

41-year-old Bruce Block is back for another year, having been kicked off the show last year after making it to the Vegas callbacks. Dressed in purple robes and a sparkly turban, he comes out and says that he will be lying on a bed of nails while a girl in a red, white and blue dress sings and tap dances before jumping on top of Bruce’s stomach. Hasselhoff, not believing the nails are actually sharp, goes up on stage and stands on Bruce to discover that, yes, Bruce was for real. Though Piers gives a no, the other two judges send him through to Vegas.

The next act is Tina Turner impersonator Dorae Saunders, who says that he is going to lip sync and dance like we’ve never seen before to “Proud Mary.” The act is totally energetic and fun and gets the audience on its feet. Piers gives a no to Faux Tina, but Sharon and the Hoff say yes to Vegas.

A montage of success hits us fast and hard next, showing a group called Tropidanza doing flipping samba while girls in showgirl outfits dance, a guy named Fast Wally that juggles insanely quick, and Bryan Cheatham, who sings “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing.” Last up are the ZOOperstars, five guys who do a hip hop routine in giant inflatable animal mascot suits.

Back to Dallas. First up are the Dallas Desperados Dancers, a group of a dozen or so attractive women in chaps who do a hip-hop dance routine with pom poms. A smitten Hasselhoff and Piers both give the girls a yes right off the bat, and Sharon likes them as well. On to Vegas they go.

18-year-old Kenneth Parrio, aka Xklusive, admits he rarely showed his talent in public for fear of ridicule. As sound effects that he mixed himself play on the loud speaker, he does a jerky robotic routine that the audience clearly enjoys. The judges found his unusual routine creative and entertaining, and so he’s on to the next round.

56-year-old warehouse worker Barry Collier believes his barnyard animal \impressions are worth a million dollars. After doing his terrible impressions, he is told by Piers that his talent is, in fact, not worth a dollar, let alone a million of them.

It’s time for another montage -- a bad audition montage: Nancy Upchurch sings unintelligibly, the Freak Show does a pretty lame hip-hop routine, Music Makes the World Go Round plays accordions in a way that does not please the audience, Mac Jay dances like a spaz, and Fancy Ray McCloney is an awful comic.

Car salesman and father Donald Braswell was in an accident 11 years ago that left him unable to speak, but he has spent the past decade working to regain his voice. He sings “You Raise Me Up” and sings well, though for some reason the audience boos and demands he be kicked off the stage. He keeps singing, however, and eventually the crowd stops jeering and begins cheering. He is given a unanimous yes from the three judges and is on to Vegas.

Next week on America's Got Talent: more auditions, more cities, more talent.


- , BuddyTV Staff Writer
(Photo courtesy of NBC)

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