'The Good Wife' Fan Columnist: Uniform Code of Injustice
'The Good Wife' Fan Columnist: Uniform Code of Injustice
Alison Stern-Dunyak
Alison Stern-Dunyak
Contributing Writer, BuddyTV

Guess what? It turns out you can be tried for the same crime twice--as long as an ethically challenged prosecutor changes the venue in a big way. I learned this during The Good Wife's latest episode, "Double Jeopardy," as it happens, which takes us inside the workings of the military justice system. 


After Will and Alicia get a client off on a murder charge, defeated prosecutor Cary asks an old friend for help. It turns out she's an Army JAG--and the murder suspect, an active-duty soldier, can be retried under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. When Will and Alicia agree to help him, things don't begin well. Apparently military court is pretty different from the cozy halls of the civilian judiciary.


The Good Wife is available on Amazon Prime.


During the trial, Will continually confronts the judge, who seems to have a grudge against him. Ultimately, he maneuvers to be thrown out of court, leaving Alicia to try the case with the help of a very able (and heroic) JAG, Lt. Hicks. Thanks to careful sleuthing by Kalinda and rival PI Blake, they gather enough evidence to find the real killer--the former commanding officer of the accused man.


In a final twist, Alicia learns that although he's now free, the soldier must report back to duty for immediate deployment to Afghanistan--his biggest fear.


Other notable evidence of a strong episode:


Point-Counterpoint


In one of those patented TGW moments, we learn Will and Diane have long represented Democratic consultant Joe Trippi, while Derek Bond has conservative pundit Lou Dobbs as a client. (Both men make amusing cameos playing themselves.)


Faster than you can say, "conflict of interest," the new partners decide they must jettison one of them. Will infuriates Diane by choosing Dobbs over Trippi because he generates more fees. But Dobbs questions whether the firm can represent him fairly. Diane bluntly tells Dobbs that if she can represent murderers, she can put aside her bias for him.


An amused Dobbs tells an amazed Diane that he'll stay on--as long as she reps him, not Bond. Honesty wins the day. And once again, the super-liberal Diane wins over a conservative, though one who isn't quite as attractive as the gun expert played by Gary Cole. (Sorry, Lou!)


Remember--You're Under Oath


Peter becomes the victim of an "Obama-Girl"-style Web video starring his former hooker girlfriend, Amber. Shortly afterwards, Eli discovers Becca, Zach Florrick's ex-gal pal, volunteering at Florrick HQ. Is there a connection? That's still up in the air, but Eli is suspicious.


Becca tells Zach she volunteered as a form of penance for sending hurtful tweets about Alicia last year. To make it up to him, she creates a phony Facebook page for Glenn Childs, Jr.--the son of Peter's evil rival.


Somehow I don't think this will end well for Becca, Zach--or Glenn Childs, Jr. On the other hand, I could watch Eli rip into Becca any day, so bring it on!


A Few Good Men--and One Good Woman


Finally, let's take a vote--when Will was angling to anger the judge so much she'd throw him in the brig for contempt, who was waiting for him to yell, "The truth? You can't handle the truth!"?


I know, I know: TGW rarely goes for the cliche moment. And Alicia taking over the role of chief counsel led to some delicious scenes, especially when Cary admitted he'd suppressed a key piece of evidence. (Oh, Cary--we hardly knew ye!) But still, Will as Jack Nicholson would have been awesome. And strange.

(Image courtesy of CBS)




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