Buddy Bites: A 'True Blood' Return, More 'Hell's Kitchen' & Emmy Rule Changes
Buddy Bites: A 'True Blood' Return, More 'Hell's Kitchen' & Emmy Rule Changes
John Kubicek
John Kubicek
Senior Writer, BuddyTV
Sometimes there's a lot of little bite-sized morsels of TV news, so I'm here to collect them all into one place like a bowl of mixed Halloween candy. So enjoy some nougaty True Blood casting news, a caramel-covered reality renewal and some Emmy rule changes (I think those would be the nickels and toothbrushes).

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A True Blood Resurrection

According to TVLine, Allan Hyde will return in True Blood's upcoming fourth season as Godric, Eric's awesome sire who was killed off in season 2. We last saw him providing guidance to Eric as Eric was dying, so perhaps there will be more Godric visions in the future, or just more flashbacks.

Hell's Kitchen Heats Up Again

FOX has renewed Hell's Kitchen for two more seasons, bringing its total to 10. Season 9 will air this summer.

No More Glory Daze

TBS has canceled its low-rated hour-long dramedy Glory Daze, about college students in the '80s. Don't worry if you have no idea what this show is, neither did a lot of people.

Emmys Change the Rules

The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences has changed several rules for this year's awards. Most importantly, the Outstanding Miniseries and Outstanding Made-for-TV Movie categories are being combined into one category with six nominees. This will save the Emmys the embarrassment of the last two years when there were only two nominees in the Miniseries category.

Also, miniseries will now be eligible for Outstanding Main Title Theme Music and the Cinematography categories will be separated by multi-camera (aka traditional sitcoms like Two and a Half Men) and single-camera instead of being divided by length (previously there were categories for half-hour and hour-long). This means shows like 30 Rock will have to compete against Mad Men, but it also means that sitcoms like The Big Bang Theory won't have to compete against half-hour dramas like In Treatment.


(Image courtesy of HBO)

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