Lost: One Answer, A Million Questions
Lost: One Answer, A Million Questions
John Kubicek
John Kubicek
Senior Writer, BuddyTV
The promos for the final season of Lost promise that questions will be answered.  The problem with that claim is that for every question Lost answers, a million new ones pop up in its place.

In "Lighthouse," fans learned that Jacob was able to control people's destinies by looking into his Magic Mirrors to see their lives.  So, in one sense, the question was answered.

But in another sense, nothing was answered.  How do the Magic Mirrors work?  Do they show the entire life of people, or just single moments such as Sun and Jin's wedding at the pagoda or Sawyer's parents' funeral at the church?  Can Jacob see everyone, or just specific numbers on the wheel?

As you can see, the answer comes with a bunch of new questions.  What is Jack's purpose?  Who is number 108, known on the wheel as Wallace, the person Jacob apparently wants to come to the Island?  Is an answer really an answer if all it does is raise more questions?

If the Island mysteries weren't enough, the flash sideways opened a can of worms for Lost theorists.  What events are changed in the altverse?  Why does Jack have a son?  Why was Dogan at the conservatory?  The altverse of season 6 doesn't provide any answers, it just raises a million new questions.

Right now there are 13 episodes left for Lost, and at this rate, if the show answered one open question every minute of every episode without raising any new questions, they still wouldn't be able to address everything.  Lost needs to focus on bringing the story to an end, not getting lost in detours and new paths that lead the show farther and farther away from a real answer.

If your ads promise that questions will be answered, deliver what you promise.  Otherwise, just like John Locke in the altverse, I may start to lose my faith that Lost will be able to give us a satisfying ending.


(Image courtesy of ABC)



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